Digital Marketing Blog

graphics Archives - Clockwork Creatives

Step 3 – Post Production: Part 2 – Titles

By | In-house Video, Video Tips | No Comments

Post Production Titles

For help implementing our guide please refer to these technical guides, depending on which software you chose to work with:

Software Technical Title Tutorial
iMovie https://support.apple.com/kb/PH14702?locale=en_GB&viewlocale=en_US
Windows Movie Maker http://windows.microsoft.com/en-gb/windows-vista/add-movie-titles-and-credits-in-windows-movie-maker
Adobe Premiere Elements https://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-elements/using/creating-trimming-titles.html
Sony Vegas http://www.sonycreativesoftware.com/webhelp/vegaspro/13/enu/index.htm#Titles.htm
Adobe Premiere Pro https://helpx.adobe.com/premiere-pro/using/creating-editing-titles.html
Final Cut Pro X http://www.macworld.com/article/2012195/create-cool-video-titles-in-final-cut-pro-x.html

Now let’s focus on the interesting bit; using these abilities to turn a profit. What makes a good title? How does one make a good title great!?

Font & Colour:

Use your existing brand fonts if possible. You probably have 2; one for the logo itself and major titles and another for everything else. You also probably have 2 or 3 font colours, consider the primary colour for headline titles and your secondary colour for smaller/ sub-titles

Feel you should use different fonts and colours from your main brand? That’s cool, just think of the video as a sub-brand. Different rules, different look but just as consistent across where it is used, perhaps all your online videos, as any other brand you’d commission or create. 

Framing:

As with your font and colour, try to have a primary and secondary position for your titles. Keep them the same. Convention would have these to be the full screen title and the subtitle. It’s best to keep full screen titles to one line. Two at the most. While subtitles can have 3 or even 4 lines, particularly when being used literally as subtitles in the context of subtitling speech.

You’ll likely want to use the full screen/ primary framing along with your primary font and colour. And, vice versa for your secondary/ subtitle framing.

Animation:

Animating your titles can help engage your audience, winning their attention for your product/ service. Typically you’ll want a zoom or a scroll. If you’re using many lines of text typically one would use a subtitle with a scroll – this makes the iconic scrolling movie end-credits. Whereas for added impact you can use the main title with a subtle zoom in.

Other animation can be used, but try not to use it for novelty. Try to communicate something about your business with the animation. Do you offer a fast service, for example? Try the titles “flying in” from left to right, and then flying out when their done. You’ll notice if you make that kind of connection creatively then it will feel a more coherent brand and help reinforce your selling points in the very fabric of the production.

Graphics

Inserting graphics is as easy as loading up footage for cutting. Just Google ‘Graphic Design’ to find out more about the creation of graphics. Once your graphic is loaded into your chosen software, you should be able to resize it and animate it as you wish. Flexibility for this varies between different software suites.

Top tip: Pan or zoom a still image, such as a landscape, to create a moving shot and save resources!